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Santa Cruz River Management Plan

For more information contact:
Evan Canfield, P.E., CFM
(520) 724-4600

The purpose of the Santa Cruz River Management Plan is to develop a management strategy to balance flood risk management, drainage infrastructure protection, water resources, recreation, education opportunities and riparian habitat preservation for the Santa Cruz River from the Santa Cruz County Line to the Pinal County Line.

Project Updates

See the Grant Rd to Pinal County tab for the latest information on this project.

Santa Cruz County Line to Pima Mine Rd

This is a future phase of this project. Relevant information will be posted here when it becomes available.

Pima Mine Rd to Grant Rd

This is a future phase of this project. Relevant information will be posted here when it becomes available.

Grant Rd to Pinal County Line (Trico Rd)

The purpose of this phase of the project is to develop a management strategy to balance flood risk management, drainage infrastructure protection, water recharge, recreation, education opportunities, and riparian habitat preservation for the Santa Cruz River from Grant Road to Trico Road.

CONTENTS

Effluent-Dependent Santa Cruz River

Background

The Lower Santa Cruz River in northeastern Pima County is Arizona’s longest effluent-dependent river and creates the County’s principal wetland habitat. Significant steps are underway to improve wetland ecosystems along the effluent-dependent Santa Cruz most notably Pima County’s Regional Optimization Master Plan (ROMP) and the Loop Recreational Trail. Using the successful EPA-funded “Living River”  series implemented by the Sonoran Institute as a model, Pima County has developed a monitoring strategy and similar reporting tool for the Lower Santa Cruz River with the assistance of a Technical Committee of experts and stakeholders.

Regional Optimization Master Plan (ROMP) upgraded the two major regional wastewater treatment plants discharging to the effluent-dependent Santa Cruz River, which began discharging improved water quality to the effluent-dependent Santa Cruz River in 2013. Pima County has been evaluating the effect of effluent water quality upgrades as a result of ROMP on a wetland health. This website includes resources collected for the project.

Living River Reports

Other project publications can be found in the tabs below.  Resources and other reference materials can be found at the Lower Santa Cruz River Research Papers and Reports page.

A Living River - Charting Wetland Conditions of the Lower Santa Cruz River

Over the three years since the upgrades, A Living River annual reports have documented profound improvements in the wetland health along the effluent-dependent Santa Cruz including:

  • Improved river water quality, including lower ammonia and biochemical oxygen demand with higher dissolved oxygen, improving conditions for aquatic life.
  • Improved water clarity.
  • Broadened diversity of macroinvertebrates, including increased presence of species sensitive to water pollution.
  • Five fish species now thrive, whereas none lived in most river reaches before.
  • Citizens observed more than 221 bird species; Sandhill Cranes sighted recently.
  • Sustained recharge has risen to about 36,600 acre-feet per year, nearly double the pre-upgrade rate, despite an 8% reduction in volume of water released to the river. 
  • RWRD’s odor measuring technology shows little to no odors leaving the wastewater facilities’ property under normal operating conditions after WRF upgrades; prior to upgrades, odors were an ongoing complaint of nearby residents and river visitors.
  • Increased linear park public use, mainly by pedestrians and bicyclists.
  • More than four thousand people have attended public education and outreach activities featuring the Living River.

In short, Living River annual reports have documented public benefit of a substantial investment in improved infrastructure, turning the river corridor from a liability to community asset.

Watch a short video on the project.

Historical Conditions Report

The report on the Historical Conditions of the Effluent-Dependent Lower Santa Cruz River was completed in March 2013 to identify baseline and past history of the effluent-dependent reach.  The report covers stream discharge and loss, channel morphology, vegetation, macroinvertebrates and water quality.  It projects changes that the team thought might occur after treatment plant upgrades.

Project Updates

No updates at the present time.

Project Location

The approximate limits of the Santa Cruz River Management Plan (Grant to Trico) are shown on the project reach map.  The lateral extent along this alignment is limited to locations where RFCD has operational control (ownership or maintenance responsibilities).

Project Description

The lower portion of the Santa Cruz River in Pima County constitutes the County’s principal wetland habitat. Comprised of routine discharge from the Regional Wastewater Reclamation facilities thereby creating improved wetland ecosystems and floodplain aesthetics along the lower Santa Cruz River. This project, with the assistance of experts and stakeholders, will provide strategic planning and planning-level alternatives to help balance environmental, water resource, recreation, education, and flood hazard needs, desires,  and concerns.

The Pima County Regional Flood Control District (District) is seeking professional consulting engineering (Consultant) services necessary for developing a Santa Cruz River Management Plan, which will identify flood hazard areas and drainage problems leading to cost-effective, multi-benefit solutions to alleviate or manage flooding in the study area.

Project Elements

This information will be provided after a consultant has been selected.

Public Involvement

The District will participate in community engagement throughout the project.  Initial insights will be from a community engagement effort of priorities, values and concerns being conducted by the Sonoran Institute, which has collected over 500 responses from an on-line survey.  To gather feedback on the public’s priorities, values and concerns and to build a vision for the river, Sonoran Institute is hosting a trio of workshops, each focused on a segment of this stretch of the Santa Cruz announced in a bill insert to all utility customers:
Invitation to Santa Cruz River Management Plan workshops