3. Analysis

Vector Space SystemsPhysically about the size of Massachusetts and home to a million people, Pima County is the largest county in southern Arizona. It is predominantly rural with the major population center in Tucson, the county seat. Pima County has the second largest population in Arizona after Maricopa County, and will continue to be a major economy in the state. The military has a large presence in Pima County, and there are many veterans with excellent skill sets living here, and they help anchor one of the most important industry sectors - Aerospace and Defense (A&D).

The Pima County Workforce Investment Board (WIB) has defined six industry sectors that include A&D, Emerging Technologies, Health and Bioscience, Infrastructure, Logistics,  and Natural and Renewable Resources.

The following sections of this Plan provide additional detail and data about Pima County’s growing, dynamic economy. Because of the growth and seasonal changes, data describing Pima County is constantly changing. Much of the data reported here is from the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO).

The University of Arizona Eller College developed the Making Action Possible (MAP) Dashboard which is a project created to measurably improve Southern Arizona through data driven collective civic action and education. This website provides users with indicators on our region’s progress, as well as access to the latest information and research. MAP fills a gap by providing a common collection of information upon which to evaluate our community and collaborate to address our shared issues. Visit the MAP Dashboard for an excellent resource of data at https://ebr.eller.arizona.edu/research-publications/making-action-possible-dashboard.

While focused on workforce, this Workforce Development Plan is consistent with Pima County’s Economic Development Plan.

Download Printer-friendly Version

JTED Students at TMC

a. Analysis of Regional Economic Conditions

i. Counties covered; brief description of the characteristics of the local area and list of service access sites.

Pima County has slightly over 1,000,000 people living in an area a little larger than the state of Massachusetts (9,240 square miles). Most of the population lives in the Metropolitan Tucson area, which includes Tucson, South Tucson, Marana, and Oro Valley. Population centers close to the metro area include Vail, Catalina, Sahuarita, and Green Valley. Some people live in distant communities such as Arivaca and Ajo.

Pima County Quick Facts 2014

Pima County Arizona United States
Median Household Income $46,233 $49,928 $53,482
Median Age 37.9 36.5 37.4
Individuals with a Disability Between 18-64 11.6% 9.9% 10.2%
Veterans 11.2% 10.0% 8.3%
Poverty Status 19.0% 18.2% 15.6%
Mean Travel Time to Work 24:12 24:42 25:42
Civilian Labor Force Participation Rate 58.8% 59.7% 63.5%
Population over 16 796,692 5,121,781 248,775,628
Produced by the Arizona Office of Employment and Population Statistics using 2014 ACS 5-Year Estimates in cooperation with the U.S. Census Bureau.

Pima County has a slightly lower labor force participation rate than Arizona (58.8% and 59.7%, respectively). Both of these are much lower than the national labor force participation rate of 63.5%.

Pima County has a lower median household income ($46,233) than Arizona ($49,928) or the United States ($53,482). Lower wages cannot necessarily be attributed to education, since Pima County has high proportions of workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher. These increased shares of higher education recipients come at the expense of lower shares of residents who failed to complete high school. This high level of education may help explain why Pima County tends to experience lower levels of unemployment than either Arizona or the United States. For example, in March of 2016, Pima County’s unemployment rate from local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) was 4.7% while both the United States and Arizona were 5.1%. Even in the high unemployment year of 2010, Pima County’s annual average unemployment rate (9.3%) was lower than both Arizona (10.4%) and the United States (9.6%).

Pima County experiences some challenges to the workforce such as high rates of poverty (19.0%) compared to Arizona (18.2%) or the United States (15.6%) and households that are reliant on public assistance programs (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) households are 3.1% of Pima County households compared to 2.5% in Arizona or 2.8% in the United States).

Historically, wages in Pima County have been lower than the national average, and the unemployment rate has generally been lower. While Pima County has participated in the economic recovery, unemployment is still stubbornly high, and wages still trail the national average. And while the next five years should see growth in employment, the next recession will probably occur sometime in this time frame.

Unemployment Rate Comparison March 2006 Chart

Click image for larger view

Produced by the Arizona Office of Employment and Population Statistics using LAUS data in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Pima County’s Economic Development Plan, which was updated in 2014, discusses several employment centers in the urban area. Central Tucson houses government, the University of Arizona and part of Pima Community College and features a revitalized downtown with start-up business activity. The southern aviation corridor is anchored by Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, the Tucson International Airport, and Raytheon and includes Pima Community College's Aviation Center. The Tucson Tech Corridor, near Vail in the Southeast, is anchored by the Port of Tucson and the University of Arizona's, Arizona Tech Park which features a range of innovation from corporate incubation to IBM. The I-10 corridor through Marana and Oro Valley includes companies such as Sargent Controls and Roche.

Job Locations (Goods Producing) Pima County 2014


Aerial Map

Click image for larger view

Source: Produced by the Arizona Office of Employment and Population Statistics using "On The Map" in cooperation with the U.S. Census Bureau.

Pima County is large enough to have a rich variety of industries, from goods-producing to service. Construction has not yet recovered to pre-recession levels, and like most areas of the country, manufacturing has been in a slow downtrend. Health services continue to be strong, and the area continues to be a resort destination.

Pima County Industry Nonfarm Employment Share

2015 Annual Average, Not Seasonally Adjusted

Pima County Industry Nonfarm Employment Share Pie Chart

Click image for larger view

Source: Produced by the Arizona Office of Employment and Population Statistics using CES data in cooperation with the U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Perhaps the most difficult challenge for the WIB is service to rural residents. While most of Pima County’s residents live in the 500 square mile urban area surrounding Tucson, some live in the other 8,700 square miles. The WIB reached back to the area’s frontier roots and created “circuit-rider” staff that moves through the small communities on a regular schedule. Another method has been a partnership with the local Pima County Public Library system.

ARIZONA@WORK Pima County One-Stop System access points:

Arizona At Work Pima County System access points

Click image for larger view

Comprehensive One-Stop Centers
Kino Service Center
2797 E. Ajo Way
Tucson, AZ 85713
520-724-7700

Rio Nuevo Service Center
340 N. Commerce Park Loop
Tucson, AZ 85745
520-724-7600

Affiliate Sites
Sullivan Jackson Employment Center
400 E. 26th Street
Tucson, AZ 85713
520-724-7300
Built by Pima County to provide services to homeless job seekers

Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center
2801 E. Ajo Way
Tucson, AZ 85713
 520-724-2646
Located next to the Kino One-Stop Center

Youth Employment Center
2323 S. Park Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85713
520-724-9649 
 

Pima Community College (PCC) Learning Centers

PCC 29th Street Coalition Center
4355 E. Calle Aurora
Tucson, AZ 85711
520-206-3550

El Pueblo Liberty Learning Center
101 W. Irvington Road, Building 7
Tucson, AZ 85714
520-206-3737

El Rio Learning Center
1390 W. Speedway Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85745
520-206-3800


Arizona Department of Economic Security (D.E.S.)
Workforce Administration, Workforce Service

Arizona D.E.S. East
5441 E. 22nd Street
Tucson, AZ 85711
520-584-8226 
 
Arizona D.E.S. North
316 W. Fort Lowell Road
Tucson, AZ 85705
520-638-2230

Arizona D.ES. South
195 W. Irvington Road
Tucson, AZ 85714
520-638-2350


Arizona Department of Economic Security (D.E.S.)
Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS)
Region II Vocational Rehabilitation Local Offices – District II

Administration
400 West Congress, #420
Tucson, AZ 85701
520.628.6810
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194

East 29th Street Office
4710 East 29th Street, #12
Tucson, AZ 85711
520.790.0787
TTY: 520.790.5674
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194

Irvington Office
195 West Irvington Road
Tucson, AZ 85714
520.638.2390
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194

Mona Lisa Office
7225 North Mona Lisa, #202
Tucson, AZ 85741
520.544.8618
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194

Romero Office
1455 South Alvernon Way, #201
Tucson, AZ 85711
520.872.9070
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194

Wilmot Office
899 North Wilmot Road, #C7
Tucson, AZ 85711
520.790.0107
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194

SBVID Office
100 North Stone Avenue, #500B
Tucson, AZ 85701
520.629.0225
TTY Server: 1.855.475.8194


Additional Service Access and Partner Sites include:
• 21 Pima County Public Library Branches
• Community Outreach Program for the Deaf (COPD)
• DK Advocates, Inc. (DKA)
• Fred G. Acosta Job Corps Center
• Goodwill Industries of Southern Arizona, Inc.
• Portable, Practical Educational Preparation, Inc. (PPEP, Inc.)
• Service Employment & Redevelopment - Jobs for Progress, Inc. (SER)
• Tucson Indian Center
• Tucson Urban League, Inc. (TUL)
• Tucson Youth Development, Inc. (TYD) 

Download Printer-friendly Version

ii. Existing and emerging in-demand industry sectors and occupations.

The WIB’s Planning Committee periodically reviews local data and economic development reports to determine which industries are critical to the growth of the local economy. It takes into consideration sectors emphasized by the Pima County Economic Development Plan, Update 2015-2017, Sun Corridor Inc. and the Arizona Commerce Authority.

The following table shows industry projections for the Tucson Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Tucson Metro Area Short-Term Industry Employment Projections 2015-2017

Industry Code  Industry Title  Base Employment 2015 Q2  Projected Employment 2017 Q2  Numeric Change  Percent Change
101100 Natural Resources and Mining 2,982 2,605 -377 -6.50%
101200 Construction 14,786 15,665 879 2.90%
101300 Manufacturing 22,269 22,387 118 0.30%
102100 Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 60,892 62,076 1,184 1.00%
102200 Information 4,385 4,532 147 1.70%
102300 Financial Activities 16,277 17,210 933 2.80%
102400 Professional and Business Services 49,024 52,290 3,266 3.30%
102500 Education and Health Services 96,976 101,403 4,427 2.30%
102600 Leisure and Hospitality 46,108 48,830 2,722 2.90%
102700 Other Services (Except Government) 11,801 12,035 234 1.00%
102800 Government 26,111 26,236 125 0.20%
102900 Unclassified 19,255 19,994 739 1.90%

The Arizona Commerce Authority has developed a “Sector Strategy” approach for the statewide workforce system. In Pima County, a number of sector initiatives have developed out of a synergistic approach that incorporates integrated cross-program strategies that meet the needs of specific populations and sub-populations as well as the workforce needs of employers in a sector at the regional level. A great example is the Southern Arizona Logistics Education Organization. At the local level, the One-Stop system has helped industry and education rejuvenate the machinist/manufacturing pipeline. For more detail on Pima County sector strategies, see Section 7.

Aerospace and Defense (also a state sector)

The nation’s fifth largest aerospace-defense industry sector accounts for 50,000 jobs in southern Arizona, many of which are in Pima County. This includes a concentration of the highest paid jobs, with military bases, defense contractors, and supporting manufacturers anchored by Davis-Monthan and major companies such as Raytheon, Bombardier, Sargent Aerospace & Defense, and World View Enterprises.

Manufacturing

Emerging Technologies

This sector encompasses entrepreneurship research and development, innovation, technology transfer and commercialization. These activities create primary jobs and drive competitiveness. Pima County has 1,200 high tech companies, ranging from established Fortune 500 companies to small start-ups, some of them resulting from technology transfer activities from the University of Arizona’s Tech Launch Arizona. The area has had a number of locally grown companies, including Burr-Brown (Texas Instruments) and Ventana Medical Systems (Roche). Today, Tech Parks Arizona, a part of Tech Launch Arizona, features an incubator that houses start-ups as well as IBM, and is currently home to 40 plus companies.

Logistics

The region’s strategic location along the U.S.-Mexico border and key trade routes accounts for the prominence of transportation and logistics, with career opportunities in purchasing, expediting, distribution, fleet management, import/export, inventory management, supply-chain management and warehousing. The major crossroads aspect of Pima County, located along Interstates 10 and 19, as well as rail connections running east and west from the sea ports of California and north and south from Mexico, is exemplified by the Port of Tucson, a full service inland port, rail yard and intermodal facility.

Major employers in the area include Union Pacific Railroad, American Airlines, Target.com Fulfillment Center, UPS, Off-Shore Group, Biagi Bros. Logistics, ABF Freight and the recently opened 800,000 square foot HomeGoods Distribution Center, serving the Southwest and Western parts of the U.S.

Logistics

Health and Bioscience

Health care and bioscience are large and vibrant industries that provide a significant number of high-paying jobs in southern Arizona, anchored by the University of Arizona Medical School, and ranging from traditional health occupations, state of the art health information systems, and cutting edge biotechnology businesses.

Employers range from medical offices to hospitals such as Tucson Medical Center, Banner University Medical Center, Carondelet Health Network, and Northwest Medical Center to biotech firms such as Accelerate Diagnostics, Ventana (Roche) and Sanofi Tucson Research Center.

Healthcare

Natural and Renewable Resources

This sector focuses on both the creation of “green” jobs, facilities and systems that help reduce or eliminate reliance on non-replaceable energy sources and the importance of extracting natural resources from the ground. The natural resource aspect of the area features mining firms and suppliers such as Freeport-McMoRan, Asarco, CAID Industries, Caterpillar Proving Grounds and newly announced relocation of Caterpillar’s Surface, Mining & Technology Division to Tucson.

NaturalResources

The renewable resource section features “Solar Zone” at the University of Arizona, Tech Parks Arizona that helps companies conduct research for new photovoltaic and other sun powered systems under the areas’ 311 days of sun each year. The Zone attracts both proven energy suppliers such as Tucson Electric Power and Duke Energy, to smaller companies such as Arizon Solar, E.On Climate & Renewables North America and REhnu Next Generation Solar.

Infrastructure

The foundations of a safe, clean, and connected community include occupations in construction, communication and utilities. Major employers include Tucson Electric Power, Southwest Energy Solutions, Southwest Gas, Cox Communications, CenturyLink, Sundt, Granite Construction, and Ashton Contractors & Engineers.

Construction

The Demand Designation Protocol provided by the Arizona Department of Administration was used to define demand occupations within broad groupings as shown in the table below:

Occupational Group Jobs Number Projected Change Percentage Projected Change Occupational Codes
Healthcare 41,904 1,775 4.2% 29-0000 
31-0000
Business Management, Operations, Support 101,698 3,975 3.9% 11-0000
13-0000
15-1100           
43-0000
Production 16,055 477 3.0% 51-0000
Construction, Building/Grounds Maintenance, Installation, Repair 49,365 1,765 4.0% 47-0000
49-0000
37-0000
Transportation and Material Handling 23,279 896 3.67% 53-0000

Download Printer-friendly Version



iii. The employment needs of employers in those industry sectors and occupations.


A subset of the occupations listed in the previous section was identified using the following combination of factors from the 2012-2022 Tucson MSA Occupational Projections:
• Educational Requirements at Associate’s level and below.
• Mean Wage at $29,000 and above.
• At least 10 projected openings per year and/or significant rate of growth.

Knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) required for these occupations are found in the corresponding O*Net pages listed below. Nearly all of the targeted occupations require critical thinking and active listening skills; many require communication, teamwork and inter-personal skills. Each industry sector has a core skill set that often involves safety standards, documentation requirements, and standard protocols. Basic qualities, including work ethic, attendance, punctuality, appropriate dress, cooperation, productivity, workplace etiquette and proper use of e-mail and internet, are constantly cited by employers across all industries as critical needs.

Healthcare

SOC Code    SOC Title    O*Net KSAs
29-1141 Registered Nurses http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-1141.00
29-2061 Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2061.00 29-2071 Medical Records and Health Information Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2071.00 29-2052 Pharmacy Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2052.00 29-2021 Dental Hygienists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2021.00 29-2012 Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2012.00 29-2041 Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2041.00 29-2034 Radiologic Technologists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2034.00
29-1126 Respiratory Therapists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-1126.00 29-2055 Surgical Technologists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2055.00 31-9091 Dental Assistants http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9091.00
31-9092 Medical Assistants http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9092.00 43-6013 Medical Secretaries http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-6013.00

 
Business Management, Operations, and Support
SOC Code    SOC Title    O*Net KSAs

11-9199 Managers, All Other http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9199.00

11-9141 Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9141.00

13-1199 Business Operations Specialists, All Other http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-1199.00

15-1151 Computer User Support Specialists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1151.00

11-9051 Food Service Managers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9051.00

13-1031 Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1031.00

15-1152 Computer Network Support Specialists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1152.00

43-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-1011.00

43-3011 Bill and Account Collectors http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3011.00

43-3021 Billing and Posting Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3021.00

43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3031.00

43-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-1011.00

43-6014 Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-6014.00

43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3031.00

43-9041 Insurance Claims and Policy Processing Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-9041.00

43-3051 Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3051.00

23-2011 Paralegals and Legal Assistants

Production/Aerospace & Defense/Security
SOC Code    SOC Title     O*Net KSAs

51-2092 Team Assemblers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-2092.00

51-4041 Machinists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4041.00

51-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-1011.00

51-4121 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4121.00

51-9061 Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-9061.00

51-2041 Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-2041.00

51-4011 Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4011.00

51-4012 Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Tool Programmers, Metal and Plastic http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4012.00

49-3011 Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-3011.00

17-3023 Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/17-3023.00

17-3026 Industrial Engineering Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/17-3026.00

33-3012 Correctional Officers and Jailers

33-3021 Detectives and Criminal Investigators

33-3051 Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers

Infrastructure/Construction
SOC Code    SOC Title    O*Net KSAs
47-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-1011.00
47-2031 Carpenters http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2031.00
47-2051 Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2051.00
47-2073 Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2073.00
47-2081 Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2081.00
47-2111 Electricians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2111.00
47-2141 Painters, Construction and Maintenance http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2141.00
47-2152 Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2152.00
49-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-1011.00
49-3023 Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-3023.00
49-3042 Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-3042.00
49-9021 Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9021.00
49-9041 Industrial Machinery Mechanics http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9041.00
49-9071 Maintenance and Repair Workers, General http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9071.00
49-9098 Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9098.00
51-8031 Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant and System Operators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-8031.00

Transportation, Material Handling & Logistics
SOC Code    SOC Title    O*Net KSAs
43-5032 Dispatchers, Except Police, Fire, and Ambulance http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-5032.00
13-1023 Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1023.00
43-5071 Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-5071.00
43-5061 Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-5061.00
53-1021 First-Line Supervisors of Helpers, Laborers, and Material Movers, Hand http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-1021.00
53-1031 First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-1031.00
53-2012 Commercial Pilots http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-2012.00
53-3021 Bus Drivers, Transit and Intercity http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-3021.00
53-3032 Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-3032.00
53-3033 Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-3033.00

Download Printer-friendly Version

iv. Proposed Lower Living Standard Income Level (LLSIL) percentages and description of how the local area will ensure that the LLSIL level is reflective of the current labor market information.

The Pima County Workforce Investment Board (WIB), through its Planning Committee, periodically reviews the Pima County labor market and wage scales and balances those against the amount of funds available for investment from WIOA. The WIB reviewed and then established the self-sufficiency level at 130% of the Lower Living Standard Income Level (LLSIL) 10 years ago and has not found a need to change it since that time.

This level will be maintained at the present, but the WIB reserves the right to review and adjust this level when it determines there may be a need in the community. The WIB also reserves the right to adjust the level to assist employers in a specific industry sector, if that sector makes a compelling argument for an adjustment that will benefit workers while improving the productivity of companies in the sector.

A region of contrasts, Southern Arizona struggles with high poverty rates and low educational attainment alongside strategic innovation assets that include a thriving transportation and logistics industry, (anchored by international ports and trade routes), four key military installations, the fifth-largest aerospace-defense industry in the nation, and a top-20 research university (i.e., Counties covered; brief description of the characteristics of the local area and list of service access sites).

Download Printer-friendly Version

Vet Fair

b. Skill Needs

An analysis of the knowledge and skills needed to meet the employment needs of the employers in the region, including employment needs in in-demand industry sectors and occupations (an existing analysis may be used, per sec. 108(c) of WIOA);

The ARIZONA@WORK Pima County One-Stop System’s vision is “connecting qualified workers with quality jobs.” The significance of that vision is that Tucson’s ability to attract quality jobs depends in part on the availability of a labor pool of qualified workers. This is consistent with the Pima County Comprehensive Plan Pima Prospers.
  •  6.4 Goal 1: Develop our workforce to meet the business needs of our economy;
  •  State Goal 3. Grow and Develop a Skilled Workforce; and
  •  State Strategy 7. Identify and Respond to High–Demand and Growing Industry/Employment Sectors at Local and Statewide Levels.
One of the first priorities for employers is to find people who understand the need to be punctual, communicate with the supervisor and team members, and dress appropriately.

Appropriate use of communication tools is also a growing need, as these tools become both more personalized and more pervasive.

Employers have identified a variety of skill set gaps in today’s workforce such as problem- solving, listening skills, and lack of teamwork. The most critical skill gap is found in the hard working person who lacks basic education skills, a high school diploma and/or is Limited English proficient. Lack of basic skills makes it all the more difficult for these people to overcome new gaps created by innovation and the rapidly changing technology.

Innovation will continue to create additional skill gaps in the medical, manufacturing and production industries as well as information technology (IT) and communications.

The One-Stop often trains and places people into positions that are one of the first rungs of a career ladder. A traditional example is nursing, where a person can be trained to be a Certified Nursing Assistant, and then with additional education and experience they may progress to a Patient Care Technician, Licensed Practical Nurse and/or Registered Nurse.

In construction trades, a person can start as a laborer, move to a more specialized helper position, then enter an apprenticeship program, and finally become a journeyman. In each case the ladder is several years in length, with wages doubling or tripling by the end.

Southern Arizona’s aerospace and defense and other high-tech industries suffer shortages of skilled workers in IT, engineering and technical-management occupations. In aerospace, the One-Stop system, JTED, and Pima Community College (PCC) set up a program for high school students to gain dual credit in the aviation program. More recently, PCC developed a short-term program to help experienced aerospace workers gain Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) certifications.

In 2010 local employers submitted H1-B visa applications for 71 engineering jobs, 97 computer positions and 15 engineering or high-tech management positions. In Workforce Needs Surveys conducted by Pima County for the past three years, 27 companies identified engineers among their five hardest-to-fill jobs, along with 25 listed IT occupations such as software engineers and security analysts. In many cases, when demand is met, it is done through external employee recruitment. Greater focus must go toward developing highly skilled, homegrown talent.

Pima County is home to the University of Arizona (UA), a top 20 U.S. public research university; PCC - the nation’s eighth largest; a branch of Northern Arizona University; and 40+ proprietary post-secondary schools.

An estimated 70,000 individuals work in high-tech occupations, one third of these being engineering/engineering technicians. Notwithstanding these assets, overall educational attainment rates lag the nation, indicating uneven access to the region’s educational opportunities.

The region has a higher concentration of people with less than a high school diploma and a smaller share with a Bachelor’s Degree, compared to both Arizona and the U.S. Statewide. Arizona ranks 35th in the nation on percentage of working-age adults with a Bachelor’s Degree, and a recent study for the Arizona Governor’s P-20 council showed that educational attainment is much lower among those entering the workforce than those about to retire. (National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, Feasibility and Demand Study for the State of Arizona, Governor’s P-20 Council, October, 2007.)

The aerospace and defense, healthcare-biotechnology, logistics, IT, and emerging technologies sectors rely upon a pipeline of professionals educated in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Not only is the traditional academic pathway in STEM unable to supply enough graduates to meet the needs, but those who do graduate are disproportionately non-Hispanic, white students. Hispanics, who make up about one third of the entire Arizona population and the bulk of projected population growth, account for only 8.9% of all Bachelor's Degrees attained.

The disparity is even more pronounced in the STEM fields. The result is a vicious cycle in which the high-skill/high-wage jobs are filled by educated in-migrants, while local workers in technician-level jobs are unable to move forward in their careers because they lack sufficient skills and education. This current workforce, including dislocated workers and Veterans with technical backgrounds, represents an untapped potential talent pool. Career-ladder development and non-traditional delivery of education is needed to allow current workers to move up into high-technology occupations, diminishing the need to import outside talent to address unmet demand.

The need for employees who can interface with computerized devices will continue to grow in many occupations as rapidly changing technology creates real or perceived skills gaps.

A current trend that is visible to many consumers in stores is the moving of Point of Sale from a central location to a roving sales clerk carrying a tablet. The push for accessible, standardized health information has the created the need for re-training many front line health care workers. Computational and higher level math skills are also increasing in demand, as well as the ability to retrieve analyze, and interpret data generated through computer software platforms.

A subset of the occupations listed in the previous section was identified using the following combination of factors from the 2012-2022 Tucson MSA Occupational Projections:
• Educational Requirements at Associate’s level and below
• Mean Wage at $29,000 and above
• At least 10 projected openings per year and/or significant rate of growth.

Knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) required for these occupations are found in the corresponding O*Net pages listed below. Nearly all of the targeted occupations require critical thinking and active listening skills; many require communication, teamwork and inter-personal skills. Each industry sector has a core skill set that often involves safety standards, documentation requirements, and standard protocols. Basic qualities, including work ethic, attendance, punctuality, appropriate dress, cooperation, productivity, workplace etiquette and proper use of e-mail and internet, are constantly cited by employers across all industries as critical needs.

Healthcare

SOC Code SOC Title O*Net KSAs
29-1141 Registered Nurses http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-1141.00

29-2061 Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2061.00

29-2071 Medical Records and Health Information Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2071.00

29-2052 Pharmacy Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2052.00

29-2021 Dental Hygienists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2021.00

29-2012 Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2012.00

29-2041 Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2041.00

29-2034 Radiologic Technologists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2034.00

29-1126 Respiratory Therapists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-1126.00

29-2055 Surgical Technologists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2055.00

31-9091 Dental Assistants http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9091.00

31-9092 Medical Assistants http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9092.00

43-6013 Medical Secretaries http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-6013.00

Business Management, Operations, and Support
SOC Code SOC Title O*Net KSAs
11-9199 Managers, All Other http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9199.00

11-9141 Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9141.00

13-1199 Business Operations Specialists, All Other http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-1199.00

15-1151 Computer User Support Specialists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1151.00

11-9051 Food Service Managers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9051.00

13-1031 Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1031.00

15-1152 Computer Network Support Specialists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1152.00

43-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-1011.00

43-3011 Bill and Account Collectors http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3011.00

43-3021 Billing and Posting Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3021.00

43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3031.00

43-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-1011.00

43-6014 Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-6014.00

43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3031.00

43-9041 Insurance Claims and Policy Processing Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-9041.00

43-3051 Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-3051.00 


Production/Aerospace&Defense
SOC Code SOC Title O*Net KSAs
51-2092 Team Assemblers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-2092.00

51-4041 Machinists http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4041.00

51-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-1011.00

51-4121 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4121.00

51-9061 Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-9061.00

51-2041 Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-2041.00

51-4011 Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4011.00

51-4012 Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Tool Programmers, Metal and Plastic http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-4012.00

49-3011 Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-3011.00 


Infrastructure/construction
SOC Code SOC Title O*Net KSAs
47-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-1011.00

47-2031 Carpenters http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2031.00

47-2051 Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2051.00

47-2073 Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2073.00

47-2081 Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2081.00

47-2111 Electricians http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2111.00

47-2141 Painters, Construction and Maintenance http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2141.00

47-2152 Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-2152.00

49-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-1011.00

49-3023 Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-3023.00

49-3042 Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-3042.00

49-9021 Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9021.00

49-9041 Industrial Machinery Mechanics http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9041.00

49-9071 Maintenance and Repair Workers, General http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9071.00

49-9098 Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9098.00

51-8031 Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant and System Operators http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-8031.00

Transportation, Material Handling & Logistics
SOC Code SOC Title O*Net KSAs
43-5032 Dispatchers, Except Police, Fire, and Ambulance http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-5032.00

13-1023 Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1023.00

43-5071 Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-5071.00

43-5061 Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-5061.00

53-1021 First-Line Supervisors of Helpers, Laborers, and Material Movers, Hand http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-1021.00

53-1031 First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators
http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-1031.00
53-2012 Commercial Pilots http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-2012.00

53-3021 Bus Drivers, Transit and Intercity http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-3021.00

53-3032 Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-3032.00

53-3033 Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/53-3033.00 
 
Download Printer-friendly Version


Theresa Lee Clinic

c. Talent Supply

An analysis of the workforce in the region, including current labor force employment (and unemployment) data, and information on labor market trends, and the educational and skill levels of the workforce in the region, including individuals with barriers to employment.

Talent Supply Now

With a labor force of nearly half a million workers, Pima County is blessed with significant talent pools, including The University of Arizona (UA), Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, and the seven campuses of Pima Community College (PCC).

The workforce is diverse, with deep social and cultural ties to Mexico. Nearly 40% of the population is Hispanic, with concentrations of 60-90% in Tucson’s southern and western census tracts.

The table below shows some key statistics about the current regional talent supply.

Total Civilian Workforce 472,008 (June 2016)*
Number unemployed 27,135 (5.7%)*
Number with HS Diploma (age 25+) or higher 560,904 (87.5%)
Number with Associates 54,978
With Bachelors or higher 197,004 (30.1%)
With Advanced Degrees 81,158
Current Armed Forces 5,100
Veterans 94,083 (12.5%)
Post 1990 Veterans 30,234
High school population 52,418
College population 78,434
Graduate school population 14,280

2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates unless otherwise noted. * Prepared by the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, in cooperation with the U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Occupations

Most workers are employed in professional, sales, clerical or office occupations. The chart below shows the distribution of workers by type of occupation. Chart 1 Occupations

Employability Challenges

Barriers to employment may include low educational attainment, disabilities, criminal record, access to childcare and access to transportation.

The following table presents statistics related to these issues.
Population Statistic
Adults without a high school diploma 81,812
People with disabilities aged 16-64 68,460/nearly 12% of working age pop.
Veterans with service-connected disabilities 17,217
Arizona prisoners released 2012* 13,513
Homeless persons 18+1 1,765
Single-parent households 36,132/about 9% of households
What a single parent with two children needs to earn to meet basic needs. $22.17
Percent of workers who drive to work 77%

2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates unless otherwise noted. *Bureau of Justice Statistics, September 2014.
1 Tucson Pima Collaboration to end Homelessness Point in Time Street Count 2016.
2 Southern Arizona Women’s Foundation, Self-Sufficiency Standard for Arizona 2012.
Another key employability factor among unemployed populations - regardless of high school diploma attainment – may be basic skills in reading, math, and language. More than half of job seekers applying for services through the Pima County One-Stop system score below the basic secondary level on the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE).
  Chart 2 Basic Skills
Pima County One-Stop Test of Adult Basic Education 2015-16. Sample size: 2,175

Download Printer-friendly Version


PVHS Graduation

d. Workforce System Capacity

An analysis of the workforce development activities (including education and training) in the region, including an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of such services, and the capacity to provide such services, to address the identified education and skill needs of the workforce and the employment needs of employers in the region.

ARIZONA@WORK Pima County One-Stop functions as a multi-agency, multi-disciplinary, regional system for coordinating workforce development resources for the benefit of employers and job seekers in Pima County.
 
Two Comprehensive One-Stop Centers offer a full continuum of basic and individualized employment and career development services for job seekers. Please see Plan section 8.a.-h. for details.

Each Center serves as an access hub for national employment and training funding programs that include WIOA-mandated Partner programs, with an on-site representative from the Arizona D.E.S. Title III Workforce Services Administration, Title II Adult Education and Literacy, Arizona D.E.S. Title IV Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and the Migrant/Seasonal Farmworker program, along with detailed service information on, and assigned point of contact for, all the programs.

As a basic function of service flow, all customers are encouraged and assisted to register in the statewide labor exchange system, the Arizona Job Connection (AJC) and to maintain and update their information in this system.

As a centralized resource for employers, ARIZONA@WORK Pima County offers recruitment services, outreach to identify training needs, on-the-job training programs, economic development linkages, target-sector development, inter-regional collaboration, and layoff aversion, response and mitigation. Please see Plan section 7.a.-e. for additional Business Services Team information.

A key capability of the system is clarifying training options. Customers receive assistance and guidance in reviewing the Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) on AJC, which allows them to compare costs, time frames, credentialing, and employment outcomes for 300-400 approved training programs. Through basic and individualized career services, customers are assisted in developing their career goals and identifying their training needs through labor-market and career research, individualized and standardized assessments, and training plan development. Training services combine educational preparation, financial assistance with tuition and related costs, and progress tracking and support.

ARIZONA@WORK Pima County draws on Pima County’s rich array of community-based and grassroots organizations by contracting with workforce agencies that bring special populations and leveraged resources into the ARIZONA@WORK Pima County One-Stop system.

The One-Stop Partner agencies that are the Pima County One-Stop Providers are selected and secured through a competitive Request for Proposal (RFP) process so the One-Stop system may hire and staff appropriate candidates for the job centers.

The interagency team at each job center thus link mandated and non-mandated community Partners with consistent service protocols and service options for workforce development. Contracted providers also enrich the array of youth service options, workshops for all ages, and literacy services.

Pima County has a special Faith-Based Community Partners Initiative that assists community groups and faith ministries to understand the and beware of the workforce services that are available and to assist their constituents to access them successfully.

The Pima County workforce system includes an integrated safety-net of programs to ensure that basic needs are met so that people can pursue their career goals. The Community Action Agency (CAA) administered by Pima County provides financial assistance to low-income households in partnership with an Emergency Services Network of community agencies. CAA services may include:
  • Rent vouchers;
  • Utility discounts and vouchers;
  • Mortgage assistance; and
  • Repair or replacement of basic utility appliances to prevent eviction, homelessness, and unsafe conditions.

Linked satellites or affiliated job centers also play a role in Pima County’s regional workforce system. The Sullivan Jackson Employment Center receives Continuum of Care funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to serve homeless job seekers through a “housing first” approach combined with intensive jobs search preparation and self-directed search.

The Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center brings together representatives from the Veterans Employment programs, the Veterans Administration, and community organizations to provide a supportive career center specifically for veterans, and its staff conduct special outreach to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and to employers seeking to hire veterans.

The Youth Employment One-Stop Center provides a youth-focused center and houses a regional summer youth employment and education recruitment campaign every spring that connects students with County-funded internship opportunities and other summer youth employment and education programs.

The system also leverages the Las Artes, Arts and Education Center, a GED and work-based learning program producing public art mosaics for the community, and Pima Vocational High School, a non-traditional charter school offering employability skills courses and paid internships as well as credit retrieval.

Through referral partnerships and on-site workforce development staffing, D.E.S. offices and Pima County Public Library branches also serve as Affiliate One-Stops and job centers in the ARIZONA@WORK Pima County One-Stop system.

Despite the comprehensiveness of the Pima County regional workforce system, there are gaps in services.

Pima County is a large geographical area. Although affiliated satellites and contracted service providers help to increase service coverage, geographical access to services is a barrier for some potential customers.

Almost all of the services mentioned above are funded with limited dollars that are often over-subscribed and may have waiting lists, priority of service protocols, or other indicators of unmet need. The barriers discussed in the previous section are not insurmountable, but they may take years of intensive and expensive services to address.

Some types of training (often those in the highest demand) are capital-intensive and heavily regulated by entities like the Arizona State Board of Nursing and the Federal Aviation Administration, so that there is limited capacity or flexibility to expand them to produce more qualified workers.

Most of the services described above are funded with grants that have detailed and sometimes conflicting requirements for eligibility, documentation and allowable activities. This means that braiding together a comprehensive solution to service needs can present administrative and paperwork burdens on both Partners and consumers.


Download Printer-friendly Version

Follow UsShare this page

Community Services, Employment and Training

Kino Service Center
Serves Dislocated Workers (persons who have been laid off)

2797 E. Ajo Way
Tucson, AZ 85713

Phone: (520) 724-7700
Fax: (520) 724-2799
TTY: (520) 724-6778

Rio Nuevo Service Center
Serves Unemployed Adults
Tortolita Building
340 N. Commerce Park Loop
Tucson, AZ 85745

Phone: (520) 724-7650
Fax: (520) 724-1266
TTY:

Youth Employment
Center
Serves Youth/Young Adults
Sentinel Building, 2nd Floor
320 N. Commerce Park Loop
Tucson, AZ 85745

Phone: (520) 724-9649
Fax: (520) 622-1633


Department Home Page
Department News
Department Directory
Department Feedback Form
Department Calendar
Boards, Commissions and Committees